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Diversity and Employee Relations

How we manage diversity and employee relations, global workforce demographic profile, work in labour relations, talent attraction, retention, training and development, diversity and equal opportunity, and non-discrimination.

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Diversity and Employee Relations

Across industries, technology and globalization are reshaping how we do business; this, in turn, affects the global labour market, with an increasing demand for high-skill technical employment 13 . At the same time, women and potentially disadvantaged groups are being better integrated into the workforce in the majority of OECD countries14. Companies are responding to these trends by investing in the development of employee skills, and working to attract and retain a more diverse workforce.

New technologies in the mining industry have the potential to enhance safety, reduce the environmental footprint of mining and reduce operating costs. Responding to and taking advantage of these technological shifts in the mining sector will require attracting the skilled talent needed to develop and implement these shifts.

Diversity is becoming a more significant priority for the mining industry, where women, Indigenous Peoples and other minorities are under-represented. A diverse workforce, which integrates a wider range of people, backgrounds and perspectives, not only helps enhance corporate performance, but it also makes local economies more resilient. As of 2018, women make up 18% of Teck’s total workforce, up from 14% in 2015, while 29% of Teck’s Board of Directors are women.

Supporting a safe, healthy and engaged workforce is at the forefront of our priorities as a business. Our people are core to the success of our operations and our sustainability strategy. We want to be an employer of choice and a company that continues to attract, develop and retain talented and engaged employees globally. We will do this by investing in our people throughout their careers, and by offering diverse and inclusive employment prospects and development opportunities that are supported by competitive remuneration and benefits linked to performance.

13The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means, how to respond. World Economic Forum. 2018. 
14OECD Employment Outlook 2018. OECD. 2018.

Our Approach to Diversity and Employee Relations

Teck’s Inclusion and Diversity Policy was developed by the Senior Executive Diversity Committee and endorsed by our Board of Directors and senior management team. The policy reflects our commitment to promoting and fostering an inclusive and diverse workforce. Our focus on inclusion and diversity aligns with our company’s core values of integrity and respect. It is also reflected in our Code of Ethics and our Code of Sustainable Conduct. Teck’s Global Harassment Policy outlines Teck’s requirement for the work environment to be free from discrimination, including harassment and sexual harassment, and procedures for reporting and investigating complaints.

Our commitment to inclusion and diversity is reflected in all levels of our company, beginning with our Board of Directors, which has adopted specific measures to ensure that female nominees are considered when candidates for election to the Board are taken into consideration.

The following senior leaders are involved in implementing the management of diversity and employee relations:

  • The Senior Vice President, Human Resources, who reports to the CEO, is responsible for human resources management and our global people strategy, which is implemented by human resource and management teams at our head office and operations. The Senior Vice President also chairs our Senior Executive Diversity Committee, which includes our Senior Vice President, Commercial and Legal Affairs, our Senior Vice President, Sustainability and External Affairs, and one rotating executive member representing our operations.

External best practices and standards inform our work in human resources:

  • Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR): A recognized leader in the development and implementation of national human resources solutions

  • International Labour Organization (ILO): A tripartite UN agency uniting member governments, employers and workers in common pursuit of social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights. Teck incorporates several ILO standards

  • Gender Equity in Mining Works: Helps companies create a mining and minerals industry where women and men have the best opportunities for making great contributions and having rewarding careers

  • Women in Mining Canada National Action Plan: Facilitates the provision of assistance to women in mine-impacted areas who are increasingly facing socio-economic problems caused by mining activities

  • 30% Club Canada: The aim of this organization is to encourage both board Chairs and CEOs to achieve better gender balance at board level as well as at senior management levels. Teck’s President and CEO is a member of the 30% Club Canada.

  • UN Women: Teck and UN Women entered into a US$1 million multi-year partnership in 2016 to promote the empowerment of Indigenous women in Chile. In 2018, the partnership was extended through an additional US$1 million investment from Teck to develop a new training centre for this program.

  • The Minerva Foundation: An organization that supports women and girls in British Columbia, Canada, to gain the confidence and skills they need to reach their leadership potential. Teck’s President and CEO is a signatory of the foundation’s Diversity Pledge.

Fostering an inclusive and diverse workforce contributes to our innovation and success through exposure to increased perspectives and ideas, helps attract a broader pool of candidates, improves employee retention, and better reflects the diversity of the communities in which we operate. Inclusion and diversity also strengthen a culture of safety, one of our core values.

Teck recognizes that, historically, women have been under-represented in the mining sector, so we are working to increase the number of women across our organization, with a focus on leadership, technical and operational roles. One of the programs that has helped to attract and retain a greater number of women at Teck is the Mining and Refining for Women project at our Trail Operations. The goal of this project is to identify workplace barriers and increase opportunities for women in technical positions such as front-line operations, and technical and professional roles.

We also implement various diversity training programs, which vary by site and operation, for employees.

Workplace Flexibility

Teck has family-friendly policies and programs that vary by location and employee group. They include academic scholarship programs for children or dependents of employees and retirees, maternity and parental leave benefits, and flexible work arrangements for employees where feasible at their work location. As obtaining childcare is becoming increasingly challenging in many regions where Teck operates, we are piloting a partnership with Kids & Company, who provide daycare services at 90 locations across Canada. Teck also provides an annual Healthy Lifestyle account to Canadian employees, which the families may use for benefits such as sports team memberships, sporting equipment, safety equipment, recreational activities and more.

Discriminatory and harassment practices are unacceptable and not tolerated in our company, and we are committed to the proper treatment of all employees. Teck’s Global Harassment Policy and Code of Ethics recognizes that all employees have a right to work in an environment free from violence and threats, including acts of physical, verbal or written aggression.

Identifying problems or violations, and quickly resolving them to prevent them from escalating or recurring, benefits all workers and the workplace environment.

Our employees are required to report any violations, or potential violations, of our Code of Ethics through our Doing What’s Right program, which includes a whistle-blower hotline and web portal that are managed by The Network, an arm’s-length third party. The hotline and portal are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in all jurisdictions in which we have employees, to provide a confidential and secure means for our employees and others to report concerns anonymously about conduct that may be contrary to our values and standards.

We do not tolerate any form of retaliation against employees raising concerns. All allegations of harassment or intimidation by others as a result of contacting the hotline/web portal or otherwise raising ethics or safety concerns are investigated, and if required, appropriate disciplinary actions are taken, which can include dismissal.

Mining is a heavily unionized industry, and we aim to develop our relationships with unions and our unionized employees at both the local and national levels. Approximately 60% of our employees are unionized. We engage with our unions on a regular basis across our operations on all aspects of business.

We fully recognize the rights of employees to freely associate and join trade unions, and we have embedded the principle in our Health, Safety, Environment and Community Management Standards. All unionized operations have employee committees with representation from their respective unions. For instance, 100% of locations have an Occupational Health and Safety Committee. Examples of other committees at our operations include Labour/Management, Training, Apprenticeship, Grievance, and Contracting Out committees.

We ensure that our minimum notice periods meet or exceed those stipulated by applicable employment standards legislation. Minimum notice periods may also be specified in collective agreements. To ensure that harassment against union members does not occur, we have global or site policies and non-discrimination measures in place that are specific to each collective agreement.

In addition to the company-wide grievance process and Global Harassment Policy, some sites have specific bullying and harassment policies that provide for a joint investigation when a unionized employee is involved. Applicable human rights and workers’ compensation legislation also governs Teck in areas where we operate.

As we operate in market conditions that require us to enhance productivity, employee engagement remains integral to our business. We focus on enhancing engagement across Teck through employee remuneration, performance review processes, employee development opportunities and labour relations practices.

Employee Remuneration

Teck is committed to providing a fair living wage to all employees and contractors. We monitor the employment market to ensure we maintain a cost-effective total compensation offering while attracting and retaining the employees needed now and in the future.

A gender pay review conducted in 2017 indicated that there was no systematic gender pay issue within our company. To ensure that the analysis was conducted in a rigorous and structured manner, the process was externally reviewed, and similar reviews will be conducted regularly in the future.

Performance Reviews, Employee Training and Leadership Development

Each year, all regular full-time, active salaried employees receive formal performance development and career reviews through our Building Strength with People program. Details on this program are provided in Table 1.

Teck is committed to the ongoing development of our people, with a focus on leadership development and technical skills. We provide all employees with a variety of training opportunities that include general business education, change and project management, gender intelligence, first aid, mine rescue, maintenance training for apprentices and tradespeople, operator training for our equipment, confined space training, and a variety of environment and safety programs. All employees may apply for additional training programs according to their local education assistance policies.

Our approach to leadership development is primarily focused on four programs: Leading for the Future, Leading for Excellence, Leadership Challenge and Emerging Leaders, as described in Table 1.

Table 1: Development Programs at Teck

Program

What Is It?

Why Do We Do It?

How Do We Measure Effectiveness?

Building Strength with People (BSWP)

Framework through which salaried employees have regular performance, development and career conversations with their supervisors. Goals tracked in BSWP are directly linked to goals in annual and five-year business plans.

To clarify and align business priorities with individual performance and development expectations, and to identify critical experiences that are necessary to meet the individual’s career interests.

 

Conduct an annual BSWP effectiveness survey, analyze results and focus on improvement based on employee feedback.

Leading for the Future (LFF)

A cohort-based program that takes place over nine months where participants attend three modules. This program is designed for front-line leaders and supervisors across Teck’s business.

Our leadership development programs are crucial to our business growth and to our future success. The programs ensure that our next generation of leaders will be prepared to lead, live Teck’s values and provide our business with a competitive edge.

Track the number of employees who participate in the programs, with an emphasis on diversity. Through business impact stories, 360° reporting and competency improvement tracking, we also track retention, movement and promotions of past program participants and their effectiveness as leaders.

Leading for Excellence (LFX)

A cohort-based program that takes place over six months where participants attend two modules with interim coaching. This program is for employees who are leaders of leaders. At many sites, this translates to Superintendent, Manager or General Supervisor.

Leadership Challenge

A site-based 10- to 12-week cohort-based program designed for graduates of the LFF and LFX programs. The program challenges participants to develop their leadership competencies through deliberate practice at work.

Emerging Leaders

A cohort-based program with five four-day modules that take place over 12 months. Participants are selected based on their future potential, and prior to the start of the program their strengths and development gaps are identified in an assessment centre. After the program, participant development plans are reviewed annually to ensure accelerated development opportunities are identified and implemented.

The program is designed to identify and prepare high-potential leaders for senior leadership roles in Teck.

The success of the program is measured by the number of annual critical experiences, assignments, rotations, transfers and promotions. The ultimate success of the program is the appointment of senior leaders in Teck from this talent pool, rather than external hires.

 

Knowledge Transfer and Succession Planning

Every employee has a unique set of experiences, skills and knowledge, which is crucial to retain as employees move into different roles or exit the organization. We conduct reviews of knowledge transfer systems to understand operationally how we are approaching this problem, what systems are in place, how to share best practices, and what areas need improvement. In addition to knowledge transfer, Teck conducts semi-annual succession and development planning meetings designed to identify skills at all levels and to ensure that they are developed in time to achieve business objectives.

Our sustainability strategy guides our long-term approach to diversity and employee relations across the organization. These goals were developed in consultation with employees and reflect our commitment to continuous improvement.

By 2020, we will:

  • Build a diverse workforce that includes more women and Indigenous Peoples

  • Develop leaders who can confidently and efficiently manage safe, respectful and productive operations

By 2030, we will:

  • Be a diverse and inclusive workforce representative of the communities in which we operate

  • Be a workplace with a shared commitment to fairness, respect, operational excellence and productivity

Our Performance in Diversity and Employee Relations in 2018

Global Workforce Demographic

At the end of 2018, there were 10,710 employees, temporary and permanent, working at Teck operations and offices.

Figure 20: Global Workforce in 2018

Figure 21: Global Workforce by Employment Level

Figure 22: Global Workforce by Age and Gender


 

Labour Relations

In 2018, two new collective bargaining agreements were signed with Union 2 and Union Admin at our Quebrada Blanca Operation in Chile. In total, 57% of our workforce is unionized. There were zero strikes in 2018.

Talent Attraction

We conducted recruitment events in several towns and universities in 2018. These activities help ensure we attract top talent and a sufficient volume of applications to fill vacancies, with a focus on co-op students and professionals in training (e.g., Engineers and Geologists). In 2018, we continued to increase our efforts in digital recruitment, primarily through social media, in an effort to reach more diverse applicants, with a focus on women. Additionally, 31% of total new hires (618) in 2018 were women. For a breakdown of new hires by age group and gender, as well as by employment type, see our online 2018 Sustainability Performance Data.

Retention, Training and Development

Teck is committed to the ongoing development of our people, with a focus on leadership development, safety training, new-hire training, cross-training, refresher training and knowledge transfer. We are enabling our workforce to go home safe and healthy every day, creating an engaged workforce capable of excelling in their current roles and equipping them with skills for future roles.

We track training hours for all activities related to further development of employees’ skills. These hours can include training provided by Teck trainers and/or external consultants; it does not include basic compliance training.

Figure 23: Investment Spend on Training (millions)

Table 22: Average Hours of Training per Employee in 2018

Type

Male

Female

Hourly

56

77

Staff

30

32

Total

51

56

 
Employee Turnover

For an overall understanding of workforce dynamics and changes, we track employee turnover, including voluntary resignations, involuntary layoffs, and retirements.

Table 23: Employee Turnover

 

2018

2017

2016

2015

Voluntary Turnover Rate

6%

6%

6%

7%

Total Turnover

8%

9%

7%

10%


Table 24: Return to Work and Retention Rates after Parental Leave

 

2018

2017

2016

2015

Number of employees who took parental leave

134

123

122

93

Number of employees who returned to work after parental leave ended

Data for 2018 will be available in the 2019 Sustainability Report

111

96

77

Return to work and retention rate of employees who took parental leave (%)

90%

79%

83%


Building Strength with People

We evaluate employee engagement by measuring the effectiveness of our Building Strength with People program, a framework through which salaried employees have regular performance reviews, development planning and career conversations with their supervisors. On an annual basis, we conduct a survey of participants to evaluate their satisfaction with the program from 0% to 100% in each of the three categories of the framework. The overall score on the survey in 2017 was 76%, which is the same score as in 2016. 2018 results will be available in mid-2019. A number of recommendations were made to improve the program going forward, particularly to address the results for development. This includes increasing the visibility of senior leadership, simplifying the software, scheduling training for supervisors and conducting a full review of the program.

Leadership Development

Teck’s approach to leadership development is primarily focused on four programs: Leading for the Future, Leading for Excellence, Leadership Challenges and Emerging Leaders. In 2018, we conducted six Leading for the Future program cohorts, four Leading for Excellence cohorts, four Leadership Challenges and the sixth cohort of our Emerging Leader Program was completed as of 2017. In addition to these programs, Teck conducted a thorough review of three of the leadership development programs to ensure that they continue to meet the needs of the business. Plans are in place to make some changes to the program in 2019 to include new content around inclusive and innovative leadership.

Engaging Employees through our Company Magazine

Teck’s Connect magazine is our source for company-wide communications. In this quarterly publication, we highlight employee achievements, community engagement activities, a letter from our CEO and much more. Visit www.teck.com/connect to read archived volumes of Connect.
 

Diversity and Equal Opportunity

In 2018, we continued to work towards building a diverse workforce that includes more women and Indigenous Peoples, focusing on a number of initiatives tied to the six areas of our Inclusion and Diversity Plan.

Table 25: Implementation of Inclusion and Diversity Plan

Area of Inclusion and Diversity Plan

Example 2018 Activities

1. Develop our people — grow a culture of inclusion that values diversity

Approximately 700 employees across Teck participated in Gender Intelligence workshops, with over 1,400 employees completing this workshop to date since 2017. Respectful Workplace training continued across our operations and sexual harassment training was rolled out across our Chilean operations.

2. Measure and report

 

We measure and report on gender diversity metrics internally and externally in the sustainability report.

3. Attract the right people — strengthen our recruitment practices

At our Carmen de Andacollo Operations, a Female Haul Truck Driver Program was launched to provide training opportunities for women from the local Andacollo community.

 

4. Foster a more inclusive culture and increase employee engagement

Teck sites in Chile participated in several industry meetings related to women in mining and with government officials in order to increase female representation in the mining industry.

5. Remove systemic barriers and biases — make processes more inclusive

Building on the success of Phase 1 and Teck’s initial US$1 million investment, UN Women and Teck announced the extension of their partnership and the development of a new training centre to empower Indigenous women in northern Chile, funded through an additional US$1 million investment from Teck. The investment will help provide Indigenous women in northern Chile with access to high-quality and culturally relevant training programs, with a focus on economic development, entrepreneurship and business management skills.

6. Continue to build our brand as an inclusive and diverse company

We joined Project RISE, a research program that is part of a larger consortium named Engendering Success in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Additionally, for the second year in a row, where Teck was a sponsor of the International Women in Resources Mentoring Program. Eighty mentees from a variety of disciplines were matched up with industry professionals to learn leadership skills.


Representation of Women at Teck

There were 1,979 women working at Teck at the end of 2018, which represents 18% of the total workforce, compared to 17% of the total workforce in 2017. Additionally, 31% of total new hires (618) in 2018 were women.

Table 26: Women in Leadership and Technical Positions

Category

2018

2017

2016

2015

Board of Directors

29%

21%

14%

25%

Senior Management

8%

7%

7%

7%

Management

20%

19%

18%

16%

Operational or Technical Positions

12%

11%

9%

8%

Of the Operational or Technical Positions, the % in Leadership Positions

7%

6%

5%

5%


Remuneration at Teck

Teck is committed to providing a fair living wage to all employees and contractors that is above the local minimum for all of our significant areas of operation. For our hourly employees, see Table 27 for the ratios of entry level wage compared to local minimum wage by gender. For Canada, Teck wages are compared against the B.C. minimum wage. In Washington state and Alaska, they are compared against the Washington state and Alaska minimum wages, respectively. In Chile, they are compared against the national minimum wage.

Table 27: Entry Level Wage Compared to Local Minimum Wage(1)

 

2018

2017

2016

Countries

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Canada

2.5:1

2.5:1

2.6:1

2.6:1

2.7:1

2.7:1

United States

1.5:1

1.5:1

1.5:1

1.5:1

1.7:1

1.7:1

Chile

2.6:1

2.6:1

2.8:1

2.8:1

2.8:1

2.8:1

1The figures represented in this table are for hourly employees, who make up approximately 65% of our workforce. This does not include contractors.


Gender Pay Equity Review

Company-wide Gender Pay Equity Reviews were conducted in 2018 and 2017, with the objective of ensuring that female and male employees across the organization receive equitable pay. The reviews were conducted by our compensation team, with results reviewed and validated by a leading third-party global consultancy. The reviews found no indication of any systemic gender pay issue within our company and differences in salaries paid are primarily due to an average of shorter service years held by female employees in the company. We will continue to maintain gender pay equity in the organization and similar reviews will be conducted regularly. 

Table 28: Ratio of Basic Salary and Remuneration in 2018

Employee Category

Average Basic Salary (Male : Female)

Average Remuneration (Male : Female)

Canada

Executive & Senior Management

1.0 : 1

1.1 : 1

Management

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

Professional

1.1 : 1

1.1 : 1

Professional Support

1.3 : 1

1.3 : 1

Administration

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

United States

Executive & Senior Management

n/a

n/a

Management

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

Professional

1.1 : 1

1.1 : 1

Professional Support

1.2 : 1

1.2 : 1

Administration

0.8 : 1

0.8 : 1

Chile

Executive & Senior Management

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

Management

1.0 : 1

1.1 : 1

Professional

1.0 : 1

1.1 : 1

Professional Support

0.9 : 1

1.1 : 1

Administration

0.9 : 1

1.0 : 1


Workplace Flexibility

A childcare benefit program was piloted in 2017 with employees in Calgary, Richmond, Toronto and Vancouver and at Highland Valley Copper Operations. The program, called Kids & Company, supports priority access to childcare services, such as flexible part-time daycare, a guaranteed childcare spot within six months of registration, camp programs during school closures, and more. Following success of the pilot, this program was established permanently at these locations in 2018.
 

Employee Feedback and Grievances

In 2018, we dealt with individual reports of harassment through our human resources procedures and received zero allegations of discrimination through our whistle-blower hotline. 


Outlook for Diversity and Employee Relations

In 2019, we will continue to improve our recruitment practices, conduct inclusive leadership related training, and advance external partnerships to support women and Indigenous Peoples. As part of our focus on inclusion and diversity, we recruited a Director of Inclusion and Diversity in early 2019, and will continue rolling out Gender Intelligence training at our Canadian, American and Chilean operations. As in past years, we will also continue to implement our strategy to attract, engage, retain and develop the best people to meet our current and future business needs.


Teck

Teck is a diversified resource company committed to responsible mining and mineral development with business units focused on copper, zinc, steelmaking coal and energy.