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Diversity and Employee Relations

How we manage diversity and employee relations, global workforce demographic profile, work in labour relations, talent attraction, retention, training and development, diversity and equal opportunity, and non-discrimination.

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102-8, 102-41, 202-1, 401-103, 401-1, 401-3, 402-103, 402-1, 403-1, 403-4, 404-103, 404-2, 405-103, 405-1, 406-1

Diversity and Employee Relations

Across industries, technology, globalization and the desire to increase diversity in the workplace are shaping the global labour market. Over the past two decades, there has been a shift away from manufacturing to services, meaning that jobs increasingly require new skills, training and flexibility. In the same period, women and potentially disadvantaged groups have been better integrated into the workforce in the majority of OECD countries.11 This is grounded in the United Nations prioritizing diversity in SDG 5 as well as full and productive employment for all in SDG 8. Companies are responding to these trends by investing in the development of employee skills, and working to attract and retain a diverse workforce to maximize performance.

In the mining industry, an aging workforce is another major trend. According to the Mining Industry Human Resources Council, over the last decade, the percentage of the population that is 55 years and older has increased from 25% in 2007 to 30% in 2016.12 With lower levels of young people employed and fewer workers to transition skills and knowledge to, this presents a significant challenge for the industry. An aging workforce, ongoing competition for talent and the need to increase productivity have continued to make training, development and succession planning a major focus for many in the industry. 

Diversity is also becoming a more significant priority for the mining industry, where women, Indigenous Peoples and other minorities are under-represented. In 2017, women accounted for 17% of the mining labour force in Canada, compared to 48% in the overall labour force.11 Closing this gap can have significant business and social benefits. A diverse workforce, which integrates a wider range of people, backgrounds and perspectives, not only helps enhance corporate performance, but it also makes local economies more resilient. As of 2017, women make up 17% of Teck’s total workforce, which is a 31% increase since 2014, while 27% of Teck’s board of directors are women as of April 2018. In addition, Teck undertook a company-wide gender pay equity review in 2017 with the objective of ensuring that female and male employees across the organization receive equitable pay. The review found no indication of any systemic gender pay issue at Teck and similar reviews will be conducted regularly to ensure Teck continues to maintain pay equity.  

In 2017, we worked to improve productivity and employee relations by maintaining constructive labour relations as we worked through contract negotiations at our Highland Valley Copper, Quebrada Blanca, Cardinal River and Trail Operations. We also conducted planning for short- and long-term changes in our workforce and advanced diversity initiatives across the company. Employee health and safety is also a core value and remained an important focus through 2017. 


(11) OECD Employment Outlook 2017. OECD Publishing, Paris. 2017.
(12) Canadian Mining Labour Market Outlook 2017. Mining Industry Human Resources Council.

Teck’s Approach to Diversity and Employee Relations

Our commitment to inclusion and diversity is reflected in all levels of our company, beginning with our Board of Directors, which has adopted specific measures to ensure that female nominees are considered when candidates for election to the Board are taken into consideration. 

The Vice President, Human Resources, who reports to the CEO, is responsible for human resources management and our global people strategy, which is implemented by human resource and management teams at each of our operations and by the corporate human resources department. He also chairs our Senior Executive Diversity Committee, which includes our Senior Vice President, Commercial and Legal Affairs, our Senior Vice President, Sustainability and External Affairs, and one rotating executive member representing our operations.

Our people are essential to our success. By establishing a strong culture of employee engagement and support for inclusion and diversity across our operations, we are able to do more, and be more, together.

We recognize that our diversity — the many different and unique things we individually and collectively bring to work each day — contributes to building a stronger workforce and makes Teck a better company. According to evidence gathered by the Mining Industry Human Resources Council, increasing gender equity and inclusion offers significant business benefits, including ensuring a pipeline of important skills and leadership talent, improving health and wellness, increasing innovation and productivity, and enhancing corporate reputation.

As such, we consciously work to create an environment that respects and values the diversity of the people and communities around us. A diverse workforce, which integrates a wider range of people, backgrounds and perspectives, not only helps enhance corporate performance, but also makes local economies more resilient.

Through employee development, leadership and succession planning, we work to ensure that our people have the capacity, competency and opportunity to grow individually and to contribute to Teck’s success. We are focused on improving productivity and employee relations by maintaining constructive labour relations. It is our objective to engage employees and to develop leaders who can confidently and efficiently manage safe, respectful and productive operations.

Teck’s Inclusion and Diversity Policy was developed by the Senior Executive Diversity Committee and endorsed by our Board of Directors and Senior Management Team. The policy reflects our commitment to promoting and fostering an inclusive and diverse workforce. Our focus on inclusion and diversity aligns with our company’s core values of integrity and respect. It is also reflected in our Code of Ethics and our Code of Sustainable Conduct. Teck’s Global Harassment Policy outlines Teck’s requirement for the work environment be free from discrimination, including harassment and sexual harassment, and procedures for reporting and investigating complaints.

Our work in human resources is informed by external best practices and standards.

  • Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR): A recognized leader in the development and implementation of national human resources solutions
     
  • International Labour Organization (ILO): A tripartite UN agency uniting member governments, employers and workers in common pursuit of social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights, Teck incorporates several ILO standards
     
  • Gender Equity in Mining Works: Helps companies create a mining and minerals industry where women and men have the best opportunities for making great contributions and having rewarding careers
     
  • Women in Mining National Action Plan: Facilitates the provision of assistance to women in mine-impacted areas who increasingly are facing socio-economic problems caused by mining activities
     
  • 30% Club Canada: The aim of this organization is to encourage both board Chairs and CEOs to achieve better gender balance at board level as well as at senior management levels. Teck’s President and CEO is a member of the 30% Club Canada
     
  • UN Women: Teck and UN Women entered into a US$1 million multi-year partnership in 2016 to promote the empowerment of Indigenous women in the northern regions of Chile where the mining sector is a major economic driver
     
  • The Minerva Foundation: An organization that supports women and girls in British Columbia, Canada, to gain the confidence and skills they need to reach their leadership potential. Teck’s President and CEO is a signatory of the foundation’s Diversity Pledge

Fostering an inclusive and diverse workforce contributes to our innovation and success through exposure to increased perspectives and ideas, helps attract a broader pool of candidates and improved employee retention, builds a stronger workforce that is engaged and contributing to Teck’s social and economic goals, and better reflects the diversity of the communities in which we operate. Inclusion and diversity also strengthens a culture of safety, one of our core values. 

Teck recognizes that historically women have been under-represented in the mining sector, and so we are working to increase the number of women across our organization, with a focus on leadership, technical and operational roles. One of the programs that has helped to attract and retain a greater number of women at Teck is the Mining and Refining for Women project at our Trail Operations. The goal of this project — which includes an overall 30-month coaching/mentorship program — is to identify workplace barriers and increase opportunities for women in the mining and resource sectors in positions ranging from front-line operations to technical and professional roles.

As part of our Inclusion and Diversity Plan, we also rolled out Gender Intelligence workshops in 2017, which help both women and men gain valuable insights in becoming more gender intelligent and inclusive and in learning to identify blind spots. To date, more than 500 employees have participated in these sessions.

Workplace Flexibility

Teck has family-friendly policies and programs that vary by location and employee group. They include academic scholarship programs for children or dependents of employees and retirees, maternity and parental leave benefits, and flexible work arrangements for employees where feasible at their work location. As obtaining childcare is becoming increasingly challenging in many regions where Teck operates, we are piloting a partnership with Kids & Company, who provide daycare services at 90 locations across Canada. Teck also provides an annual Healthy Lifestyle account to Canadian employees, which the families may use for benefits such as sports team memberships, sporting equipment, safety equipment, recreational activities, fitness equipment and more.

Discriminatory and harassment practices are unacceptable and not tolerated in our company, and we are committed to the proper treatment of all employees. Teck’s Code of Ethics recognizes that all employees have a right to work in an environment free from violence and threats, including acts of physical, verbal or written aggression. Our whistle-blower hotline is Teck’s avenue for employees to report any violation against the Code of Ethics, including discrimination or harassment. The hotline and portal are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in all jurisdictions in which we have employees, to provide a confidential and secure means for our employees to report. For more information, see our Code of Ethics

Identifying problems or violations, to enable them to be quickly and properly resolved or to prevent them from escalating or recurring, benefits all workers and enhances the workplace for the betterment of all concerned.

Our employees are required to report any violations, or potential violations, of our Code of Ethics through our Doing What’s Right program, which includes a whistle-blower hotline and web portal that are managed by The Network, an arm’s-length third party. The hotline and portal are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in all jurisdictions in which we have employees, to provide a confidential and secure means for our employees to report concerns about conduct that may be contrary to our values and standards. 

We do not tolerate any form of retaliation against employees raising concerns. All allegations of harassment or intimidation by others as a result of contacting the hotline/web portal or otherwise raising ethics or safety concerns are investigated, and if required, appropriate disciplinary actions are taken, which can include dismissal.

Mining is a heavily unionized industry, and we aim to develop our relationships with unions and our unionized employees at both the local and national levels. Approximately 60% of our employees are unionized. We engage with our unions on a regular basis across our operations on all aspects of business.

We fully recognize the rights of employees to freely associate and join trade unions, and we have embedded the principle in our Health, Safety, Environment and Community Management Standards. All unionized operations have employee committees with representation from their respective unions. For instance, 100% of locations have an Occupational Health and Safety Committee. Examples of other committees at our operations include Labour/Management, Training, Apprenticeship, Grievance, and Contracting Out committees.

We ensure that our minimum notice periods meet or exceed those stipulated by applicable employment standards. Minimum notice periods may also be specified in collective agreements. Whenever possible, we also work collaboratively with unions to engage our hourly employees.

To ensure that harassment against union members does not occur, we have policies and procedures in place which include global and site-specific company policies and non-discrimination measures that are specific to each collective agreement.

In addition to the grievance process through which employees can file bullying and harassment complaints, some sites have bullying and harassment policies, which provide for a joint investigation when a unionized employee is involved. Teck is also governed by applicable Human Rights and Workers’ Compensation legislation in areas where we operate. 

As we operate in market conditions that require us to enhance productivity, employee engagement remains integral to our business. We focus on enhancing engagement across Teck through employee remuneration, performance review processes, employee development opportunities and labour relations practices.

Employee Remuneration

High-quality employment is one of the most important benefits we provide to the communities where we operate. This is not only due to the economic benefits that we distribute in the form of salaries and local spending, but also because of the valuable skills and experience that our employees are able to accumulate through their work and training. We monitor the employment market to ensure we maintain a cost-effective total compensation offering while attracting and retaining the employees needed now and in the future. 

Teck conducted a gender pay review in 2017, and the review indicated that there was no systematic gender pay issue within our company. The review process was externally reviewed to ensure that the analysis was conducted in a rigorous and structured manner. To ensure that we continue to maintain gender pay equity in the organization, similar reviews will be conducted regularly.

Performance Reviews — Building Strength with People

Each year, all regular full-time, active salaried employees receive formal performance development and career reviews. This program is also an avenue for employees to provide feedback to supervisors on their career interests, including location preferences, certifications and training, and roles they would like to be considered for in the future. 

We concentrate on improving the quality of conversations, specifically on development and career conversations and on the connection between compensation and performance. In addition, we are in various stages of implementation and execution of annual performance and development reviews, including career conversations, for our hourly employees.

Employee Training and Leadership Development 

Teck is committed to the ongoing development of our people, with a focus on leadership development and technical skills. We provide all employees with a variety of training opportunities that include general business education, change and project management, gender intelligence, first aid, mine rescue, maintenance training for apprentices and tradespeople, operator training for our equipment, confined space training, and a variety of environment and safety programs. All employees may apply for additional training programs according to their local education assistance policies.

Our approach to leadership development is primarily focused on four programs: Leading for the Future, Leading for Excellence, Leadership Challenge and Emerging Leaders. These programs and the ongoing development of our leaders is critical to the future success of our company, as we continue to grow in today’s rapidly shifting markets. The measurement of program effectiveness is done through a variety of methods, which includes tracking employee participation with an emphasis on diversity, reviewing business impact stories, 360° reporting, retention, and promotions of past program participants and their effectiveness as leaders.

Table 1: Development Programs at Teck

Program

What Is It?

Why Do We Do It?

How Do We Measure Effectiveness?

Building Strength with People (BSWP)

Framework through which salaried employees have regular performance, development and career conversations with their supervisors. Goals tracked in BSWP are directly linked to goals in annual and five-year business plans.

To clarify and align business priorities with individual performance and development expectations as well as to identify critical experiences that are necessary to meet the individual’s career interests.

Conduct an annual BSWP effectiveness survey, analyze results and focus on improvement based on employee feedback.

Leading for the Future (LFF)

A cohort-based program that takes place over nine months where participants attend three modules. This program is designed for front line leaders and supervisors across Teck’s business.

Our leadership development programs are crucial to our business’ next stage of growth and future success. The programs ensure that our next generation of leaders will be prepared to lead, live Teck’s values and provide our business a competitive edge.

Track the number of employees who participate in the programs, with an emphasis on diversity. Through business impact stories, 360° reporting and competency improvement tracking, we also track retention, movement and promotions of past program participants and their effectiveness as leaders.

Leading for Excellence (LFX)

A cohort-based program that takes place over six months where participants attend two modules with interim coaching. This program is for employees who are leaders of leaders. At many sites, this translates to Superintendent, Manager and General Supervisor.

Leadership Challenge

A site-based 10- to 12-week cohort-based program designed for graduates of the LFF and LFX programs. The program challenges participants to develop their leadership competencies through deliberate practice at work.

Emerging Leaders

A cohort-based program with five four-day modules that take place over 12 months. Participants are selected based on their future potential, and prior to the start of the program their strengths and development gaps are identified in an assessment centre. After the program, participant development plans are reviewed annually to ensure accelerated development opportunities are identified and implemented.

The program is designed to identify and prepare high-potential leaders for senior leadership roles in Teck.

The success of the program is measured by the number of annual critical experiences, assignments, rotations, transfers and promotions. The ultimate success of the program is the appointment of senior leaders in Teck from this talent pool rather than from an external hire.

Knowledge Transfer and Succession Planning

Every employee has a unique set of experiences, skills and knowledge, which is crucial to retain as employees move into different roles or exit the organization. Our demographics related to retirements make this an important business imperative. We conduct reviews of knowledge transfer systems to understand operationally how we are approaching this problem, what systems are in place, how to share best practices, and what areas need improvement. In addition to knowledge transfer, Teck conducts semi-annual succession and development planning meetings designed to identify skills at all levels and to ensure that they are developed in time to achieve business objectives.

Our Performance in Diversity and Employee Relations in 2017

Global Workforce Demographic

At the end of 2017, there were 10,109 employees, temporary and permanent, working at Teck-operated mining and metallurgical operations and offices.

Figure 23: Global Workforce in 2017

Figure 24: Global Workforce by Employment Level (as at year-end)

Figure 25: Global Workforce by Age and Gender

Labour Relations

Collective bargaining was completed at our Highland Valley Copper, Cardinal River, Trail and Quebrada Blanca operations in 2017. 58% of our workforce was unionized in 2017. In December 2017 at our Quebrada Blanca Operations, the Union of Workers of Quebrada Blanca, which represents 105 employees, went on strike for seven days before a collective agreement was reached the same month. 
 

Talent Attraction

In 2017, we implemented new global applicant tracking software to strengthen the security of data, to streamline and enhance the management of recruitment, and to provide additional information on the diversity of our applicants. The system allows applicants to self-identify their ethnic background, and we have begun tracking this data with a focus on women and Indigenous Peoples across our operations. 

We conducted recruitment events in several Canadian towns and universities. These activities ensure we attract top talent and sufficient volume of applications to fill vacancies, with a focus on co-op students and Professionals in Training (e.g., Engineers and Geologists). In 2017, we increased our efforts in digital recruitment, primarily through social media, in an effort to reach more diverse applicants, with a focus on women.

We developed new marketing and advertising campaign strategies that target local women to build awareness and promote career opportunities. As a result, the number of female applicants for haul truck positions more than doubled in 2017 compared to 2016. In terms of hiring, 155 women joined Teck in haul truck or labour positions in 2017, representing 29% of all new hires in these positions for the year. 

Table 21: New Hires by Age Group and Gender 

Gender

Country

Under 30 Years Old

30 to 50 Years Old

Over 50 Years Old

Female

Canada

165

188

44

Chile

12

14

3

United States

37

22

4

Other

4

3

0

Total Female

 

218

227

51

Male

Canada

365

475

101

Chile

12

33

6

United States

91

89

22

Other

5

2

2

Total Male

 

473

599

131

Grand Total

 

691

826

182

 
Retention, Training and Development

Teck is committed to the ongoing development of our people, with a focus on leadership development, safety training, new-hire training, cross-training, refresher training and knowledge transfer. We are enabling our workforce to go home safe and healthy every day, creating an engaged workforce capable of excelling in their current roles and equipping them with skills for future roles.

Figure 26: Investment Spend on Training

Training hours that are tracked are all activities related to further development of employees’ skills. These hours can include training provided by Teck trainers and/or external consultants; it does not include basic compliance training.

Table 22: Average Hours of Training in 2017 per Employee 

Type

Male

Female

Hourly

98

104

Staff

16

19

Total

67

49

 
Employee Turnover

For overall understanding of workforce dynamics and changes, we track employee turnover, including voluntary resignations, involuntary layoffs and retirements. In 2017, total turnover was 9%, compared to 7% in 2016, 10% in 2015 and 12% in 2014. Our voluntary turnover rate was 6% in 2017, compared to 6% in 2016.

Table 23: Total Employee Turnover 

Gender

Country

Under 30 Years Old

30 to 50 Years Old

Over 50 Years Old

Female 

Canada

5

43

32

Chile

3

6

1

United States

6

5

3

Total

 

14

54

36

Male

Canada

38

179

281

Chile

11

97

43

United States

20

47

22

Other

1

5

3

Total

 

70

328

349

Grand Total

 

84

382

385

 
Table 24: Return to Work and Retention Rates after Parental Leave

 

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

Number of employees who took parental leave

123

122

93

116

89

Number of employees who returned to work after parental leave ended

Data for 2017 will be available in the 2018 Sustainability Report

96

77

111

83

Return to work and retention rate of employees who took parental leave (%)

79%

83%

96%

93%

 
Building Strength with People

We evaluate employee engagement by measuring the effectiveness of our Building Strength with People program, a framework through which salaried employees have regular performance reviews, development planning, and career conversations with their supervisors. On an annual basis, we conduct a survey of participants to evaluate their satisfaction with the program from 0% to 100% in each of the three categories of the framework. 

The overall score on the survey in 2016 was 76%, compared to 77% in 2015. In the performance area, there was an improvement to 86% from 84% in 2015. In development, there was a decrease to 70% from 74% in 2015, and in career conversations, there was a slight improvement to 69% from 68% in 2015. 2017 results will be available in mid-2018. 

A number of recommendations were made to improve the program going forward, particularly to address the results for development. This includes increasing the visibility of senior leadership, simplifying the software, scheduling training for supervisors and conducting a full review of the program. 

 
Leadership Development

Teck’s approach to leadership development is primarily focused on four programs: Leading for the Future, Leading for Excellence, Leadership Challenges and Emerging Leaders. In 2017, we conducted five Leading for the Future program cohorts, three Leading for Excellence cohorts, seven Leadership Challenges and the sixth cohort of our Emerging Leader Program. In the Leadership Challenge, past Leading for Excellence graduates act as group coaches, while Leading for the Future graduates work with both their supervisors and coaches to identify a development area and practise a leadership competency for a 10-week period following a three-day on-site workshop. In a joint evaluation assessment, each participant and his or her supervisor evaluated the participant’s level of effectiveness and found an 83.5% increase in capability and effectiveness in leadership development, as well as sustained improvement six months later.

 
Engaging Employees through our Company Magazine

Teck’s Connect magazine is our source for company-wide communications. In this quarterly publication, we highlight employee achievements, community engagement activities, a letter from our CEO and much more. Visit www.teck.com/connect to read archived volumes of Connect.

 
Diversity and Equal Opportunity 

In 2017, we continued to work towards building a diverse workforce that includes more women and Indigenous Peoples, focusing on a number of initiatives tied to the six areas of our Inclusion and Diversity Plan.

Table 25: Implementation of Inclusion and Diversity Plan

Area of Inclusion and Diversity Plan

2017 Activities

1. Develop our people —grow a culture of inclusion that values diversity

Approximately 760 leaders across Teck participated in Gender Intelligence workshops and 97% of feedback survey respondents rated the workshops as good or excellent.

2. Measure and report

We measure and report on gender diversity metrics internally and externally in the sustainability report.

3. Attract the right people — strengthen our recruitment practices

We conducted a variety of recruitment events targeted to women. At our steelmaking coal operations, we hosted a Women in Mining Career Fair and information workshop in Sparwood, B.C., which had a strong turnout and resulted in several new hires.

4. Foster a more inclusive culture and increase employee engagement

We are piloting a childcare benefit program in Canada, enhancing development plans for high-potential women, improving the interview process to ensure diverse candidates and interviewers, and developing flexible work schedules for select site-based roles. In Chile, the Inclusion and Diversity Working Group developed a plan for cultural change. We also conducted a pay equity review.

5. Remove systemic barriers and biases — make processes more inclusive

Job titles were updated across Teck to be inclusive. In Chile, changes were made to human resources policies with respect to daycare as well as to dependent eligibility, so that all eligible employees’ spouses who are not working may receive coverage, regardless of gender or sexual orientation. The Quebrada Blanca Phase 2 project team reviewed the project design with respect to diversity considerations of the facilities, employment plan and leadership composition.

6. Continuing to build our brand as an inclusive and diverse company

We feature content about diversity in our employee communications. We also partner with the University of British Columbia and the Engendering Success in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Consortium to improve the attraction and retention of women in STEM.

 

Representation of Women at Teck

There were 1,678 women working at Teck at the end of 2017, which represents 17% of the total workforce, compared to 1,452 women and 15% of the total workforce in 2016. 

Table 26: Women in Leadership and Technical Positions

Category

2017

2016

2015

2014

Board of Directors

21%

14%

14%

25%

Senior Management

7%

8%

7%

6%

Management

19%

17%

16%

16%

Operational or Technical Positions

10%

9%

8%

8%

Of the Operational or Technical Positions, the % in Leadership Positions

6%

5%

5%

4%

 

Remuneration at Teck

Teck is committed to providing a fair living wage to all employees and contractors. For our hourly employees, see the ratios of their entry level wage compared to local minimum wage by gender in Table 27.

Table 27: Entry Level Wage Compared to Local Minimum Wage(1)

 

2017

2016

Countries

Female

Male

Female

Male

Canada

2.6:1

2.6:1

2.7:1

2.7:1

United States

1.5:1

1.5:1

1.7:1

1.7:1

Chile

2.8:1

2.8:1

2.8:1

2.8:1

(1) The figures represented in this table are for hourly employees, which make up approximately 65% of our workforce. This does not include contractors.

For Canada, Teck wages are compared against the B.C. minimum wage. In Washington state and Alaska, they are compared against the Washington state and Alaska minimum wages, respectively. In Chile, they are compared against the national minimum wage. Teck provides competitive wages that are above the local minimum for all significant areas of operation.

 
Gender Pay Equity Review

A company-wide Gender Pay Equity Review was conducted in 2017, with the objective of ensuring that female and male employees across the organization receive equitable pay. The review was conducted by our compensation team, with results reviewed and validated by a leading third-party global consultancy. The review focused primarily on permanent, salaried employees located in Canada, Chile and the United States, with a wide range of pay component data being collected and analyzed. The review found no indication of any systemic gender pay issue within our company. This key finding was important; to ensure that we continue to maintain gender pay equity in the organization, similar reviews will be conducted regularly. 

Table 28: Ratio of Basic Salary and Remuneration in 2017

Employee Category

Average Basic Salary (Male : Female)

Average Remuneration (Male : Female)

Canada

Executive & Senior Management

1.1 : 1

1.2:1

Management

1.0 : 1

1.0:1

Professional

1.1 : 1

1.1:1

Professional Support

1.3 : 1

1.3:1

Administration

1.1 : 1

1.1:1

United States

Executive & Senior Management

n/a

n/a

Management

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

Professional

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

Professional Support

1.2 : 1

1.2 : 1

Administration

0.8 : 1

0.8 : 1

Chile

Executive & Senior Management

1.0 : 1

1.1 : 1

Management

1.2 : 1

1.2 : 1

Professional

1.0 : 1

1.0 : 1

Professional Support

0.9 : 1

1.0 : 1

Administration

0.9 : 1

1.0 : 1

 
Workplace Flexibility

A childcare benefit program is being piloted with employees in Calgary, Richmond, Toronto and Vancouver and at Highland Valley Copper. The one-year program with Kids & Company supports access to childcare services. During the pilot, eligible employees will have priority access to several services and benefits, including flexible part-time daycare, a guaranteed childcare spot within six months of registration, camp programs during school closures, and more. Participating employees are responsible for covering the cost of the program. 

 
Employee Feedback and Grievances

In 2017, we dealt with individual reports of harassment through our human resources procedures and received four allegations of discrimination through our whistle-blower hotline. The allegations were based on issues of race, physical disability, family status, and entitlement to retirement benefits. Following the complaints, interviews were conducted with all concerned (except for anonymous reports), and the issues were either resolved completely or we are progressing toward reaching a resolution. It is important to note that allegations may be reflective of perceived or actual events, and therefore do not necessarily represent an actual negative impact or act of discrimination. Teck’s practice is that all feedback is acknowledged and assessed, and a response is communicated to the complainant, with the goal of providing a satisfactory reply or resolution in a timely manner.

Outlook for Diversity and Employee Relations

We will continue to implement our strategy to attract, engage, retain and develop the best people to meet our current and future business needs. In 2018, we will continue to implement our inclusion and diversity plan, upgrade our human resources software platforms, support the business as it evaluates new and emerging technologies, enhance employee engagement by improving our Building Strength with People program, provide access to new training programs, and develop resources in order to accelerate the transition of skills and knowledge from experienced workers to younger workers.

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Teck is a diversified resource company committed to responsible mining and mineral development with business units focused on copper, zinc, steelmaking coal and energy.