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Our Workforce

Diversity and equal opportunity, employment, labour relations, non-discrimination and training/development.

Why was Our Workforce a Material Topic in 2016?

As the world becomes more global and the population more mobile, competition for workers is increasing. At the same time, the nature of employment is changing. Jobs increasingly require more complex skills and training. Leading companies recognize that a high-performing workforce is linked to business value. They are investing in the development of employee skills and working to attract and retain a diverse workforce to maximize performance.

Learn More
The Future of Jobs Report-  World Economic Forum

With the downturn in commodity markets, mining companies are facing significant financial challenges and pressure to reduce costs. As a result, throughout 2015 mining companies across the industry undertook significant workforce reductions. For example, more than 26,000 jobs in the Canadian mining industry 1 and 131,000 jobs in the American mining industry 2 were eliminated. At the same time, an aging workforce, ongoing competition for talent and the need to increase productivity have continued to make training, development and succession planning a major focus for many in the industry.

(1) Statistics Canada Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours - January 2016

(2) United States Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Highlights - January 2016

In line with the rest of the industry, the downturn in commodity markets resulted in decreased revenues and lower profits for Teck. As part of our focus on cost reduction, in November 2015 we began reducing our workforce by 1,000 positions across all offices and operations, to be completed by the end of 2016. This will bring our total labour force reductions since 2014 to approximately 2,000 positions. We recognize that workforce reductions create stress on our employees, and in turn, on our business and communities. To address this, we continue to provide employees with training, development and mentorship opportunities to enhance productivity in a safe and sustainable way.   

Performance Highlight

332 employees

were engaged in leadership development programs in 2015.

 

Our Stories

Our Targets and Commitments

We are committed to building a diverse workforce that includes more women and Indigenous People and developing leaders who can confidently and efficiently manage safe, respectful and productive operations.

How Does Teck Manage Our Workforce?

Our nearly 10,000 employees worldwide have expertise across a wide range of activities related to mining and mineral processing including exploration, development, smelting, refining, safety, environmental protection, product stewardship, recycling and research.  

Our global workforce strategy is to attract, engage and develop the very best people. In 2015, our efforts in human resources supported these three pillars and Teck’s cost reduction program. We also developed a new set of short-term goals to 2020 and revised our long-term goals to 2030 for developing our workforce within our sustainability strategy.

Our Vice President, Human Resources, who reports to the CEO, is responsible for human resources management and our global workforce strategy, which is implemented by human resource and management teams at each of our operations and by the corporate human resources department. Our work in human resources is informed by external best practices and standards including the standards set by the International Labour Organization and the Mining Industry Human Resources Council and our internal commitments as outlined in our Charter of Corporate Responsibility, Code of Ethics, Human Rights Policy, and Health and Safety Policy. 

 

Although hiring was limited in 2015 due to current market conditions, we continued to develop our attraction strategies to ensure that Teck remains in a strong position to attract top talent when required and when market conditions improve. To this end, we focused on improving diversity, workforce planning and optimizing our recruitment resources and processes.

Workforce Diversity
We believe our workforce should reflect the diversity of the communities where we operate and that a more diverse workforce allows for a greater diversity of perspectives, leading to more informed and balanced decision-making. 

In 2015, we developed a diversity strategy to create a more diverse workforce at all levels of the company in alignment with our 2020 goal of building a diverse workforce that includes more women and Indigenous Peoples. We will be reporting on our progress against this goal in the years ahead.

Historically, women have been under-represented in our workforce, which is why we are focused on increasing recruitment and retention of women. We track the percentage of women hired at Teck with a focus on women who work in technical and operational roles, two areas that have historically been under-represented in our industry. The non-administrative roles such as trades, technical, labourers and equipment operators are the most difficult demographic to attract and retain across the industry. Attracting women to Teck starts with our job postings and as such, we reviewed them for “gendered” language and are replacing it with language that has been proven to be more influential in attracting women to apply. 

We continue to be involved in external groups to provide insight into Teck’s practices in diversity and to share information. Our Vice President of Human Resources represents Teck on the Women in Mining (WIM) Canada Gender Advisory Committee and the Mining Industry Human Resources (MiHR) Gender Equity in Mining committee in Canada. Other involvement by Teck employees includes the MiHR Mining Alternative Careers for Immigrants and two University of British Columbia Studies: Women of Impact in the Canadian Materials, Metallurgy and Mining Field, and Engendering Engineering Success. In Chile, Teck regularly attends the Trabajando.com recruitment fair in the city of Antofagasta and the Mine Engineer recruitment fair at the University of Chile.

Overall, we continue to work to achieve our goal of having an inclusive and diversified workforce. The changes that have been made to date have had an impact on our demographics and this trend should continue as we advance our efforts to attract a more diverse workforce. 

Non-Discrimination
Discriminatory practices are unacceptable and are not tolerated in our company. We are committed to the proper treatment of employees and to providing a procedure for employees to report incidents of discrimination or harassment, whether they involve a co-worker, a supervisor or any other person. We comply with all local laws that address discrimination and harassment, and we investigate all allegations. In 2015, while we dealt with individual reports of harassment through our human resource procedures, we did not receive any allegations of discrimination through our whistle-blower hotline (see our Business Ethics section on page 43 for more information on our Doing What’s Right program). 

As part of Teck’s ongoing commitment to build a more diverse and inclusive culture and work environment, Unconscious Bias Training was held for the senior management team in 2015. Implicit or unconscious bias can affect how we hire, promote, develop and mentor. Unconscious Bias Training is part of our efforts to increase awareness and eliminate any potential discriminatory practices. 

Workforce Planning and Recruitment 
Skill shortages across various competing industries and an aging workforce will result in high competition for labour in coming years. Accurate and timely workforce planning is essential to correctly position Teck to proactively respond to and strategize for looming demographic challenges. In 2015, we created and implemented a tool to forecast workforce needs and inform our recruitment strategies. 

While hiring was reduced in 2015, Teck continues to focus on recruitment to ensure we have the right people with the right skills to meet business requirements. To that end, improved recruiting practices and processes were put in place to guide recruiters, operations leaders and human resources leaders last year. For example, we increasingly focus our recruitment efforts through online platforms such as social media to reduce our costs and increase our capacity to target specific skill sets. 

 

As part of our focus on cost reduction, in November 2015 we began reducing our workforce by 1,000 positions across all offices and operations, to be completed by the end of 2016. Workforce reduction is challenging for the individuals involved and we supported affected employees and their families in this transition by providing exit packages that included personal counselling and coaching, assistance with career transition and help with understanding opportunities available in the wider economy, in addition to financial compensation. Wherever possible, personnel were directed to other opportunities available at Teck. 

Engaging Our People
As we operate in market conditions that require us to enhance productivity, employee engagement remains integral to our business. Research shows that some of the top drivers of employee engagement in any organization include: being recognized, being rewarded fairly, having development opportunities, and a good relationship between the employee and their supervisor. We focus on enhancing engagement across Teck through employee remuneration, performance review and labour relations.

Employee Remuneration 
High-quality employment is one of the most important benefits we provide to the communities where we operate. This is not only due to the economic benefits that we distribute in the form of salaries and local spending, but also because of the valuable skills and experience that our employees are able to accumulate through their work and training. 

We continue to monitor the employment market to ensure we maintain a cost-effective total compensation offering while continuing to attract and retain the employees needed to be successful now and in the future. A global compensation and benefits strategy was developed in 2015 to allow Teck to be competitive in the different areas where we are located and the different industries where we compete for talent. 

To help employees better understand the value of their compensation, we issued total compensation statements to the majority of salaried employees in the United States and Canada and for hourly employees at our Trail, Red Dog, and steelmaking coal operations. The statements include information regarding an employee’s salary, bonuses, premiums, long-term incentive plan, benefits and retirement savings, and summarize the total value of the compensation received for the respective calendar year. 

Performance Review 
Over 90% of our regular full-time, active salaried employees received formal performance development and career reviews in 2015. In addition, we are in various stages of implementation and execution of annual performance and development reviews, including career conversations, for our hourly employees 

Building Positive and Productive Labour and Management Relations
Building positive employee relations is a key objective for us. Mining is a heavily unionized industry, and we continue to develop our relationships with unions and our unionized employees at both the local and national levels. Approximately 62% of our workforce is unionized. We engage with our unions on a regular basis across our operations on all aspects of our business. In 2015, this included a focus on cost reduction, health and safety, tailings management and community concerns. Furthermore, we engage with unions on grievances and labour relations on a site-by-site basis. We formally engage unions through negotiations on collective agreements. There were no strikes exceeding one week’s duration in 2015. 

We fully recognize the rights of employees to freely associate and join trade unions, and we have embedded the principle in our Health, Safety, Environment and Community Management Standards. All operations have employee committees covering various matters. For example, 100% of locations have an Occupational Health and Safety Committee to deal with safety issues. Examples of other committees found at our operations include: Labour/Management, Training, Apprenticeship, Grievance, and Contracting Out committees. We ensure that our minimum notice periods meet or exceed those stipulated by applicable employment standards. Minimum notice periods may also be specified in collective agreements. Whenever possible, we work collaboratively with unions to engage our hourly employees.

Through employee development, leadership development, knowledge transfer and succession planning, we work to ensure that our people have the capacity, competency and opportunity to grow individually and contribute to Teck’s success. 

Table 6: Development Programs at Teck

Program

What is it?

Why do we do it?

How do we measure effectiveness?

Building Strength with People (BSWP)

Framework through which salaried employees have regular performance, development and career conversations with their supervisors. Goals tracked in BSWP are directly linked to goals in five-year business plans.

To clarify and align business priorities with individual performance and development expectations as well to identify critical experiences that are necessary to meet the individual’s career interests.

Conduct an annual BSWP effectiveness survey, analyze results and focus on improvement based on employee feedback.

Leading for the Future

A series of workshops for supervisors and team leaders who are currently supervising employees on the front line of Teck's business.

To prepare a new generation of leaders to replace our current leaders, who will retire soon. Moreover, we rely on our leaders to develop the people we need to deal with current and future business challenges.

Track the number of employees who participate in the programs, with an emphasis on women. We also track retention, movement and promotions of past program participants and their effectiveness as leaders through business impact stories and 360 reporting.

Leading for Excellence

A series of workshops for people who are currently managing other managers; at many sites, this translates to Superintendent, Manager and General Supervisor.

Emerging Leaders

A year-long program for employees who are on track to reach key senior positions in the company.

Employee Development 
We continue to focus on employee development, with a particular focus on developing skills and knowledge through on-the-job application. As an organization, we focus on identifying critical experiences that are necessary to meet current and future business needs, as well as an individual’s career interests. In 2015, we reviewed our apprenticeship program and developed a new strategy to ensure the program adequately meets retirement demand and business needs. We also developed a plan to leverage existing supervisor skill programs and implement best practice training throughout the company. 

Building Strength with People, our performance and development program, continues to be the framework through which salaried employees have regular performance, development and career conversations with their supervisors. Our focus over the past few years has been to improve the process, supporting tools, documentation and, mostly, the conversations. Our annual Building Strength With People effectiveness survey shows that the quality of these conversations is continuing to improve. The results this year showed the largest year-over-year increase in the survey’s overall results, with significant improvements in each of the three areas surveyed: performance, development and career. That said, there continues to be room for improvement on the quality of conversations, specifically on development and career conversations and the connection between compensation and performance. 

In addition to Building Strength with People, Teck is working to ensure training hours are documented completely and consistently across our operations. In 2016, we are focused on developing a system to ensure every site uses the same method to track training costs and hours. Company-wide data and reporting will give us the ability to analyze training costs and opportunities for cost savings.  

Leadership Development
Teck’s approach to leadership development is primarily focused on three programs: Leading for the Future, Leading for Excellence and Emerging Leaders. Leading for the Future is targeted at supervisors and team leaders who are currently supervising employees on the front line of Teck's business. Leading for Excellence is aimed at people who are currently managing other managers; at many sites, this translates to Superintendent, Manager and General Supervisor. Emerging Leaders is targeted at employees who are on track to reach key senior positions in the company. These programs and the development of our leaders are critical to the future success of our company, as many of our current leaders will retire soon. Moreover, we rely on our leaders to develop the people we need to deal with current and future business challenges.

Knowledge Transfer and Succession Planning
As experienced workers retire, we work to ensure their skills and knowledge are transferred to the young people in professional, operational and trades roles. In 2015, we began reviewing knowledge transfer systems currently in place at our operations in an effort to improve knowledge transfer. Company-wide results will be analyzed and shared to ensure we are effective in preparing for the retirement of key personnel over the next five to 10 years. 

In addition to knowledge transfer, Teck conducts succession planning and talent management through robust and meaningful conversations about talent development at site, department, business unit, and corporate levels. Tracked through our Building Strength with People system, the succession planning process was updated in 2015 to include a greater focus on diversity.  

Sustainability Strategy Spotlight

Progress Against Our 2015 Goals

  • Conducted a review of knowledge transfer systems currently in place at our operations in an effort to improve knowledge transfer.
  • Engaged 332 employees in leadership development programs.
  • Improved recruiting practices and processes to guide recruiters, operations leaders and human resources leaders.

 

What was Our Performance in Our Workforce in 2015?

In this section, we report on our global workforce profile and progress against our global workforce strategy of attracting, engaging and developing our people. 
Our Global Workforce Profile

At the end of 2015, there were 10,037 employees  working at Teck-operated mining and metallurgical operations and offices. The figures and tables below present data on our workforce, broken down by age, gender, geographic location and employment type. 

Figure 7: Global Workforce by Geographic Location and Gender 

Figure 9: Global Workforce by Employment Level (as at year-end) 

 

Table 7: Global Workforce by Employment Level (as at year-end) 

Employment Level

2015

2014

2013

Operations

6,860

7,342

7,124

Administration

363

470

538

Professional Support

1,066

1,130

1,189

Professional

1,023

1,101

1,148

Management

600

612

615

Executive & Senior Management

125

120

117

Total

10,037

10,775

10,731

 

Figure 8: Global Workforce by Age and Gender 

Attracting the Right People in 2015

Diversity 
Despite the overall decrease in the workforce in 2015, the number of women in technical or operational roles has increased at Teck from 439 in 2010 to 688 in 2015, which represents an increase of 57% over a five-year period. Women make up 14% of our total workforce and 52% of these women work in technical or operational roles, compared to 37% in 2010. Female engineers and geoscience fields are actively tracked and we have seen increased growth over the five years of 95% and 28%, respectively.

We recognize the importance of increasing the number of women in leadership roles, particularly at the site level. Since we began measuring this data in 2010, the number has climbed from 47 women in supervisory roles to 127 in 2015. This represents an increase of 170% over a five-year period. 

Table 8: Women in Operational or Technical Positions 

 

% Change Since 2010

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

Labourer, Operator, Loss Prevention

68%

321

339

327

278

235

191

Technical

46%

191

174

183

166

153

131

EIT

50%

3

3

2

2

4

2

Engineer

95%

72

71

72

72

49

37

Geoscience

28%

46

49

51

56

48

36

Apprentice

-50%

7

10

12

11

13

14

Trade

30%

26

27

25

20

19

20

Superintendent

180%

14

14

13

9

7

5

Supervisor

100%

6

5

6

5

5

3

Total

56%

686

692

691

619

533

439

As a percentage of all employees in operational or technical roles (%)

47

7.2

6.4

6.2

5.6

4.9

4.5

 

Table 9: Women in Operational or Technical Leadership Positions1

 

% Change Since 2010

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

Leadership positions within the above

175

129

111

96

78

67

47

Percentage of women in operational or technical leadership positions (%)

75

19

16

14

13

12

11

(1) Leadership positions in technical or operational roles are defined as someone in a senior operator, supervisor or lead role.

Engaging Our People in 2015

Labour Relations
In 2015, three collective agreements at Quebrada Blanca Operations, in which negotiated with two-year terms; at Carmen de Andacollo Operations, two agreements were negotiated with four-year terms; and at Line Creek Operations, a new agreement was negotiated with a five-year term. An agreement was reached at Coal Mountain Operations in March 2016 and collective bargaining at Elkview and Fording River Operations is currently underway. 
Teck worked to improve our collective bargaining strategy in 2015 by:

  • Updating guiding principles for collective bargaining including processes for committees, objective setting, communications and contingency planning
  • Reviewing top collective agreement issues for every unionized operation
  • Reviewing employee relations best practices at non-union operations
  • Drafting a five-year labour relations plan in consultation with a working committee of Human Resources professionals, Vice Presidents and General Managers 


In 2015, a union certification vote was conducted at Greenhills Operations, in which the majority of employees voted against representation by the United Steelworkers.

Employee Turnover 
For overall understanding of workforce dynamics and changes, we track employee turnover, including voluntary resignations, involuntary layoffs and retirements. In 2015, total turnover was 10% compared to 12% in 2014 and 8% in 2013. 

Table 10 below outlines voluntary and total turnover numbers, and rates by gender and age group across the regions in which we operate. There was a slight decrease in voluntary turnover in 2015, but the rate remains relatively consistent with 2014.

Table 10: Voluntary Turnover by Region and Gender 

Gender

Country

Under 30 years Old

30 to 50 years old

Over 50 years old

Female

Canada

8

33

37

 

Chile

5

18

3

 

China

-

1

-

 

Ireland

-

2

-

 

USA

4

4

5

Total

 

17

58

45

Male

Canada

51

195

300

 

Chile

13

95

71

 

China

-

1

-

 

USA

26

39

27

Total

 

90

330

398

Grand Total

 

107

388

443

 

Table 11: New Hires by Age Group and Gender 

Gender

Country

Under 30 years Old

30 to 50 years old

Over 50 years old

Female

Canada

11

23

4

 

Chile

4

8

1

 

USA

7

4

2

Total

 

22

35

7

Male

Australia

1

-

-

 

Canada

44

93

14

 

Chile

4

22

8

 

Peru

-

1

1

 

USA

30

55

28

Total

 

79

171

51

Grand Total

 

101

206

58

 

Table 12: Return to work and retention rates after parental leave

 

2015

2014

2013

Number of employees who took parental leave

93

116

89

Number of employees who returned to work after parental leave ended

Data for 2015 will be available at year-end 2016

111

83

Return to work and retention rate of employees who took parental leave (%)

96%

93%

 

Developing Our People in 2015

  • More than 3,000 employees used our Building Strength with People system to set and track annual and career objectives
  • 332 employees were engaged in leadership development programs

Leadership Development
Teck’s strong commitment to leadership development continued in 2015, with the delivery of five Leading for the Future program cohorts and the implementation of the Leadership Challenge Program that included members of former Leading for Excellence cohorts. In the Leadership Challenge, past Leading for Excellence graduates act as group coaches, while Leading for the Future graduates work with both their supervisors and coaches to identify a development area and practice a leadership competency for a 10-week period following a three-day on-site workshop. 

Outlook for Our Workforce

The downturn in commodity prices will continue to have a significant impact on our workforce including the ongoing workforce reductions planned to take place throughout 2016. Although our workforce is being reduced we recognize that, like any business, our success is dependent on the quality of our people. As a result, we will continue to implement our global workforce strategy to attract, engage, retain and develop the very best people to meet our current and future business needs. In 2016, this will include continuing to implement our diversity strategy, training and mentorship programs and leadership development across our business. We will continue negotiations for collective agreements at our Elkview and Fording River operations.  

 

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Teck is a diversified resource company committed to responsible mining and mineral development with business units focused on copper, zinc, steelmaking coal and energy.