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Our Workforce

Employee demographic profile, benefits, talent attraction, labour relations, retention, training and development, diversity and equal opportunity, non-discrimination, freedom of association, and collective bargaining.

Why was Our Workforce a Material Topic in 2016?

The world is becoming more interconnected and the population more mobile, which influences the job market. Competition for workers is increasing and, at the same time, the nature of employment is changing. Jobs increasingly require more complex skills and training, and leading companies recognize that a high-performing workforce is linked to business value. Therefore, they are investing in the development of employee skills, and working to attract and retain a diverse workforce to maximize performance.

A diverse workforce, which integrates a wider range of people, backgrounds and perspectives, not only helps enhance corporate performance, but it also makes local economies more resilient. The United Nations has prioritized diversity in SDG 5, as well as full and productive employment for all in SDG 8. 

Learn More
World Economic Forum, The Global Gender Gap Report, 2016

In light of the market conditions in 2016, companies are now working to improve their balance sheets and make their business more resilient in the face of volatile markets. At the same time, an aging workforce, ongoing competition for talent and the need to increase productivity have continued to make training, development and succession planning a major focus for many in the industry. Diversity is also becoming a more significant priority for the mining industry, where women, Indigenous Peoples and other minorities have typically been under-represented. 

In 2016, we worked to improve productivity and employee relations by maintaining constructive labour relations as we worked through contract negotiations at our Elkview and Fording River operations. We also conducted planning for short- and long-term changes in our workforce and advanced diversity initiatives across the company.

Employee health and safety is a core value and remained an important focus through 2016. To learn more about our approach and performance in this regard, view the Health and Safety of Our Workforce page.  

Performance Highlight

Nearly $16 million

was invested into employee training programs this year

 

Our Stories

  • Employee Recognition through the Excellence Awards
  • Safety Innovation at Coal Mountain Operations in support of our High-Potential Risk Control Strategy
  • Preparing for Extreme Weather Conditions at Quebrada Blanca
  • Tool Time at Teck: Employee Innovation Improves Safety and Reduces Maintenance Time
  • Teck Teams Excel at BC Annual Mine Safety Awards
  • Greenhills Operations Receives National Safety Trophy
  • Mentorship for Women at Teck Trail Operations
  • Making Working at Heights Safer at Trail Operations
  • Teck Employees ‘Take 5’ for Safety
  • Supporting Mine Rescue Training in Andacollo
  • Developing a Highly Skilled Workforce
  • High-Potential Risk Control Strategy
  • Safe Snowmobiling in the Elk Valley
  • Developing Our Managers
  • Teck’s Health and Wellness Program Saves Lives
  • Using the Incident Cause Analysis Method to Investigate Incidents and Prevent Future Occurrences
  • Keeping Our People Healthy and Safe through Sleep Management
  • Expanding Opportunities for Women at Carmen de Andacollo
  • Taking Steps to Stay Safe
  • Promoting Gender Diversity
  • Employee Recognition Programs
  • Recruitment – See Yourself at Teck
  • People - Building Our Greatest Asset
  • Our Courageous Safety Leadership Journey
  • Supporting SDG 5: Focusing Community Investment on the Empowerment of Women
  • Our Targets and Commitments

    We are committed to being a diverse workforce, representative of communities in which we operate. Teck is committed to supporting an inclusive and diverse workplace that recognizes and values difference. We recognize that our diversity — the many different and unique things we individually and collectively bring to work each day — contributes to building a stronger workforce and a better company.

    A full list of commitments is set out in our new Inclusion and Diversity Policy. 

    How Does Teck Manage Our Workforce?

    As part of our focus on cost reduction, in November 2015 we began reducing our workforce by 1,000 positions across all offices and operations, to be completed by the end of 2016. Workforce reduction is challenging for the individuals involved and we supported affected employees and their families in this transition by providing exit packages that included personal counselling and coaching, assistance with career transition and help with understanding opportunities available in the wider economy, in addition to financial compensation. Wherever possible, personnel were directed to other opportunities available at Teck. 

    Our nearly 10,000 employees worldwide have expertise across a wide range of activities related to mining and mineral processing, including exploration, development, smelting, refining, safety, environmental protection, product stewardship, recycling and research. 

    Our Vice President, Human Resources, who reports to the CEO, is responsible for human resources management and our global people strategy, which is implemented by human resource and management teams at each of our operations and by the corporate human resources department. Our work in human resources is informed by external best practices and standards, including the standards set by the International Labour Organization and the Mining Industry Human Resources Council, and by our internal commitments as outlined in our Charter of Corporate Responsibility, Code of Ethics, Human Rights Policy, Health and Safety Policy, and Inclusion and Diversity Policy.

    As we operate in market conditions that require us to enhance productivity, employee engagement remains integral to our business. We focus on enhancing engagement across Teck through employee remuneration, performance review processes, employee development opportunities and labour relations practices.

    Employee Remuneration

    High-quality employment is one of the most important benefits we provide to the communities where we operate. This is not only due to the economic benefits that we distribute in the form of salaries and local spending, but also because of the valuable skills and experience that our employees are able to accumulate through their work and training. We monitor the employment market to ensure we maintain a cost-effective total compensation offering while attracting and retaining the employees needed to be successful now and in the future. This includes an annual analysis of salary ratios by gender, to assess whether there is a gender pay gap.

    Performance Reviews — Building Strength with People

    Over 94% of our regular full-time, active salaried employees received formal performance development and career reviews in 2016. The results of the program’s annual effectiveness survey show significant improvements in each of the three areas surveyed: performance, development and career. We concentrate on improving the quality of conversations, specifically on development and career conversations and on the connection between compensation and performance. In addition, we are in various stages of implementation and execution of annual performance and development reviews, including career conversations, for our hourly employees. Read a case study on the evaluation of our Building Strength with People program.

    Employee Development

    Through employee development, leadership development, knowledge transfer and succession planning, we work to ensure that our people have the capacity, competency and opportunity to grow individually and contribute to Teck’s success. Employee development is important to Teck, particularly developing skills and knowledge through on-the-job application to meet future business needs and an individual’s career interests.

    Teck is committed to the ongoing development of our people, with a focus on leadership development and technical skills. We provide employees with a variety of training opportunities that include first aid, mine rescue, maintenance training for apprentices and tradespeople, operator training for our equipment, confined spaces information, and a variety of environment and safety programs.

    Leadership Development

    Teck’s approach to leadership development is primarily focused on three programs: Leading for the Future, Leading for Excellence, and Emerging Leaders. These programs and development of our leaders are critical to the future success of our company, as many of our current leaders will retire in the coming years.

    Knowledge Transfer and Succession Planning

    Every employee has a unique set of experiences, skills and knowledge, which is crucial to retain as employees move into different roles or exit the organization. Our demographics related to retirements make this an important business imperative. We conduct reviews of knowledge transfer systems to understand operationally how we are approaching this problem, what systems are in place, how to share best practices, and areas for improvement.

    In addition to knowledge transfer, Teck conducts semi-annual succession and development planning meetings designed to identify skills at all levels and to ensure that they are developed in time to achieve business objectives. 

    Teck continues to focus on recruitment to ensure we have the right people with the right skills to meet our business requirements. To that end, recruiting practices and processes are continuously reviewed and improved upon to guide recruiters, operations leaders and human resources leaders. Skill shortages across various competing industries and an aging workforce will result in high competition for labour in coming years. Accurate and timely workforce planning is essential to ensure Teck is well positioned to proactively respond to demographic challenges. 

    Table 21: Development Programs at Teck

    Program

    What Is It?

    Why Do We Do It?

    How Do We Measure Effectiveness?

    Building Strength with People (BSWP)

    Framework through which salaried employees have regular performance, development and career conversations with their supervisors. Goals tracked in BSWP are directly linked to goals in annual and five-year business plans.

    To clarify and align business priorities with individual performance and development expectations as well to identify critical experiences that are necessary to meet the individual’s career interests.

    Conduct an annual BSWP effectiveness survey, analyze results and focus on improvement based on employee feedback.

    Leading for the Future

    A series of workshops for supervisors and team leaders who are currently supervising employees on the front line of Teck's business.

    To prepare a new generation of leaders to replace our current leaders, who will retire in the coming years. Moreover, we rely on our leaders to develop the people we need to deal with current and future business challenges.

    Track the number of employees who participate in the programs, with an emphasis on women. Through business impact stories and 360° reporting, we also track retention, movement, and promotions of past program participants and their effectiveness as leaders.

    Leading for Excellence

    A series of workshops for people who are currently managing other managers. At many sites, this translates to Superintendent, Manager and General Supervisor.

    Emerging Leaders

    A year-long program for employees who are on track to reach key senior positions in the company.

     

    Mining is a heavily unionized industry, and we aim to develop our relationships with unions and our unionized employees at both the local and national levels. Approximately 60% of our employees are unionized. We engage with our unions on a regular basis across our operations on all aspects of business. In 2016, this included a focus on health and safety and community concerns. We engage with unions on grievances and labour relations on a site-by-site basis and we formally engage unions through negotiations on collective agreements. There were no strikes in 2016.

    We fully recognize the rights of employees to freely associate and join trade unions, and we have embedded the principle in our Health, Safety, Environment and Community Management Standards. All unionized operations have employee committees with representation from their respective unions. For instance, 100% of locations have an Occupational Health and Safety Committee. Examples of other committees at our operations include Labour/Management, Training, Apprenticeship, Grievance, and Contracting Out committees. We ensure that our minimum notice periods meet or exceed those stipulated by applicable employment standards. Minimum notice periods may also be specified in collective agreements. Whenever possible, we also work collaboratively with unions to engage our hourly employees.

    We believe our workforce should reflect the diversity of the communities where we operate and that an inclusive and diverse workforce allows for more informed decision-making. We track the percentage of women hired at Teck, with a focus on women who work in technical and operational roles, two areas that have historically been under-represented in our industry. In 2016, we developed and released an Inclusion and Diversity Policy, endorsed by our Board of Directors and senior management team, and aligned with our values and existing corporate charters and policies. View the full Inclusion and Diversity Policy

    Teck supports several industry initiatives on inclusion and diversity, such as the Gender Equity in Mining (GEM) Works Initiative, the Women in Canadian Mining National Action Plan, and the Engendering Success in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) study to understand and combat the various ways that cultural biases stand in the way of creating inclusive cultures for women in STEM. To learn more about these initiatives and others, please visit the Memberships and Partnerships page

    Inclusion and Diversity Policy

    Teck is committed to supporting an inclusive and diverse workplace that recognizes and values difference. We recognize that our diversity — the many different and unique things we individually and collectively bring to work each day — contributes to building a stronger workforce and a better company.

    Teck respects and appreciates differences in age, ethnicity, Indigenous origin or heritage, gender, physical attributes, beliefs, language, sexual orientation, education, nationality, social background and culture, or other personal characteristics.

    We know that making the most of the wealth of ideas, talents, skills, backgrounds and perspectives all around us helps us to do more and be more, together. As such, we consciously work to create an environment that respects and values the diversity of the people and world around us.

    Teck promotes and fosters an inclusive and diverse workforce in order to:

    • Contribute to innovation and better decision-making through exposure to increased perspectives and ideas
    • Attract a broader pool of candidates and improved employee retention
    • Build a strong workforce that is engaged and contributing to Teck’s social and economic goals
    • Better reflect the diversity of the communities in which we operate

    Our commitment to inclusion and diversity is reflected in all levels of our company, beginning with our Board of Directors, which considers diversity in the selection criteria for new board members and senior management team appointments. An Executive Diversity Committee chaired by the Vice President of Human Resources, with representation from senior management, guides development of Teck’s inclusion and diversity strategy, and reviews progress.

    Teck’s focus on inclusion and diversity aligns with our company’s core values of integrity and respect. It is also explicitly reflected in our Charter of Corporate Responsibility, our Code of Ethics and our Code of Sustainable Conduct.

    What was Our Performance in Our Workforce in 2016?

    In this section, we report on our global workforce demographic profile and progress in labour relations, talent attraction, retention, training and development, diversity and equal opportunity, and non-discrimination. 

     

    Our Global Workforce Demographic Profile

    At the end of 2016, there were 9,799 employees(2),(3) working at Teck-operated mining and metallurgical operations and offices. 

    Figure 11: Global Workforce by Geographic Location and Gender 

    (2) Historical human resources-related data throughout this report has been restated due to continual enhancement of human resource reporting systems to improve data integrity and the implementation of standard definitions.
    (3) The data in this section includes both temporary and permanent employees.

    Figure 12: Global Workforce by Employment Level (as at year-end) 

    Figure 13: Global Workforce by Age and Gender 

     

    Labour Relations

    Collective bargaining was completed at our Fording River, Coal Mountain and Elkview operations in 2016 and, at the time this report was being prepared, continues at Highland Valley Copper Operations.

    In 2017, two agreements were extended at Quebrada Blanca Operations. Collective agreements at Trail, Quebrada Blanca and Cardinal River operations will expire in 2017.

     

    Talent Attraction in 2016

    In 2016, the Global Talent Attraction team initiated the implementation of a new Applicant Tracking System (ATS) for Teck. This ATS will integrate with our existing programs to increase productivity, efficiency and reporting capability for recruiters, human resources, hiring managers, and leadership. New web-based marketing functionality that integrates with this ATS will also be implemented to increase our ability to attract an inclusive and diversified pipeline of new talent. For a full breakdown of our new hires in 2016 by age, gender and country, see the 2016 Sustainability Performance Data. (insert link when available)

     

    Talent Attraction in 2016

    Table 22: Number of New Hires by Age Group and Gender

    Gender

    Country

    Under 30 Years Old

    30 to 50 Years Old

    Over 50 Years Old

    Female

    Canada

    16

    23

    9

    Chile

    3

    2

    1

    China

    2

    0

    0

    United States

    2

    7

    2

    Total

     

    23

    32

    12

    Male

    Japan

    0

    0

    1

    Canada

    31

    82

    26

    Chile

    1

    18

    5

    Peru

    0

    1

    0

    United States

    28

    58

    19

    Total

     

    60

    159

    51

    Grand Total

     

    83

    191

    63

     

    Retention, Training and Development

    Table 23: Voluntary Turnover Number by Region and Gender

    Gender

    Country

    Under 30 Years Old

    30 to 50 Years Old

    Over 50 Years Old

    Grand Total

    Female 

    Canada

    6

    34

    23

    63

    Chile

    4

    3

    -

    7

    China

    1

    1

    -

    2

    United States

    1

    -

    1

    2

    Total

     

    12

    38

    24

    74

    Male

    Canada

    20

    104

    277

    401

    Chile

    -

    19

    8

    27

    Ireland

    -

    1

    -

    1

    Mexico

    -

    -

    1

    1

    Unites States

    7

    24

    23

    54

    Total

     

    27

    148

    309

    484

    Grand Total

     

    39

    186

    333

    558

     

    Table 24: Return to Work and Retention Rates after Parental Leave

     

    2016

    2015

    2014

    2013

    Number of employees who took parental leave

    122

    93

    116

    89

    Number of employees who returned to work after parental leave ended

    Data for 2016 will be available at year-end 2017

    77

    111

    83

    Return to work and retention rate of employees who took parental leave (%)

    83%

    96%

    93%

     

     

    Retention, Training and Development

    Employee Turnover

    For overall understanding of workforce dynamics and changes, we track employee turnover, including voluntary resignations, involuntary layoffs, and retirements. In 2016, total turnover was 7%, compared to 10% in 2015, 12% in 2014 and 8% in 2013. Our voluntary turnover rate was 6% in 2016. For a full breakdown of our voluntary turnover by age, gender and country, as well as retention rates after parental leave, see the 2016 Sustainability Performance Data

     

    Leadership Development

    Four Leading for the Future program cohorts, two Leading for Excellence cohorts, nine Leadership Challenges, and the commencement of cohort six of our Emerging Leader Program were achieved in 2016. In the Leadership Challenge, past Leading for Excellence graduates act as group coaches, while Leading for the Future graduates work with both their supervisors and coaches to identify a development area and practice a leadership competency for a 10-week period following a three-day on-site workshop.

    In a joint evaluation assessment, each participant and his or her supervisor evaluated the participant’s level of effectiveness and found a 58% increase in capability and effectiveness in leadership development, as well as sustained improvement six months later.

    Teck is committed to the ongoing development of our people, with a focus on leadership development and technical skills.

     

    Table 24: Dollars Spent on Training across the Company(1)

    Dollars spent on training across the company

    2016

    2015

    $15,968,055

    $9,367,827

    (1)This data only began being tracked in 2015

     

    Based on information available, we have begun reporting on training expenditures across the company; moving forward, we will continue reporting on this metric. We are also working to ensure training hours are documented completely and consistently across our operations.

     

    Diversity and Equal Opportunity

    There were 1,452 women working at Teck at the end of 2016, which represents 15% of the total workforce. The number of women in technical or operational roles has increased from 619 in 2012 to 748 at the end of 2016, which represents a 20.8% increase over a five-year period. As part of our commitment to building a more diverse workforce, we will continue to place a focus on increasing the number of women at Teck.

    We also recognize the importance of increasing the number of women in leadership roles, particularly at the site level. Of employees in technical and operations roles, 8% are women; this is a 43% increase over the past five years.

     

    Table 25: Women in Operational or Technical Positions

     

    % Change Since 2012

    2016

    2015

    2014

    2013

    2012

    Labourer, Operator, Loss Prevention

    39.6%

    388

    321

    339

    327

    278

    Technical

    10.8%

    184

    191

    174

    183

    166

    Engineer in Training (EIT)

    50.0%

    3

    3

    3

    2

    2

    Engineer

    (2.8%)

    70

    72

    71

    72

    72

    Geoscience

    (12.5%)

    49

    46

    49

    51

    56

    Apprentice

    (54.5%)

    5

    7

    10

    12

    11

    Trade

    30.0%

    26

    26

    27

    25

    20

    Superintendent

    55.6%

    14

    14

    14

    13

    9

    Supervisor

    40.0%

    7

    6

    5

    6

    5

    Total

    20.8%

    748

    686

    692

    691

    619

    As a percentage of all employees in operational or technical roles (%)

    42.9%

    8.0%

    7.2%

    6.4%

    6.2%

    5.6%

     

    Table 26: Women in Operational or Technical Leadership Positions(1)

     

    % Change Since 2011

    2016

    2015

    2014

    2013

    2012

    Of the women listed in Table 25, the percentage of those who are in leadership roles

    23.1%

    16%

    19%

    16%

    14%

    13%

    (1) Leadership positions in technical or operational roles are defined as someone in a senior operator, supervisor or lead role.

     

    Table 27: Ratios of Entry Level Wage by Gender Compared to Local Minimum Wage(5)

    Countries

    Female

    Male

    Canada

    2.7:1

    2.7:1

    United States

    1.7:1

    1.7:1

    Chile

    2.8:1

    2.8:1

    (5) The figures represented in this table are for hourly employees, which make up approximately 65% of our workforce. This does not include contractors.

     

    For Canada, Teck wages are compared against the B.C. minimum wage. In Washington state and Alaska, they are compared against the Washington state and Alaska minimum wages respectively. In Chile they are compared against the national minimum wage. Teck provides competitive wages that are above the local minimum for all significant areas of operation.

     

    Non-Discrimination

    In 2016, while we dealt with individual reports of harassment through our human resource procedures, we received one allegation of discrimination through our whistle-blower hotline related to receiving support for training in a new position. Following the complaint, interviews were conducted with all concerned and the issue was cooperatively resolved. 

    Non-Discrimination

    Discriminatory practices are unacceptable and are not tolerated in our company. We are committed to the proper treatment of all employees and to providing a procedure for employees to report incidents of discrimination or harassment, whether they involve a co-worker, a supervisor or any other person. We comply with all local laws that address discrimination and harassment, and we investigate all allegations. 

    Outlook for Our Workforce

    We will continue to implement our global people strategy to attract, engage, retain and develop the best people to meet our current and future business needs. In 2017, this will include focusing on achieving diversity in all roles across our operations and implementing our Inclusion and Diversity Policy. We will also work towards new collective agreements at our Highland Valley Copper, Trail, Quebrada Blanca and Cardinal River operations.

    Teck Logo

    Teck is a diversified resource company committed to responsible mining and mineral development with business units focused on copper, zinc, steelmaking coal and energy.